Screenshot_20220422-062531

Your Blood Type Matters When It Comes to Heart Health

Do you know your blood type?

Unless you’ve donated blood, were given a transfusion or found out during pregnancy, maybe you’ve never thought twice about it. But coursing through your veins every second of every day are tiny variations that categorize your blood into one of these groups: A+, A-, B+, B-, O-, O+, AB+ and AB-.

Ongoing research into blood type suggests it may matter more than we give it credit for — at least when assessing risk for certain health conditions, especially heart disease. These invisible differences in the blood may give some people an edge at staving off cardiovascular problems, and may leave others more susceptible.

What does blood type mean, and how are they different?

The letters A, B and O represent various forms of the ABO gene, which program our blood cells differently to form the different blood groups. If you have type AB blood, for example, your body is programmed to produce A and B antigens on red blood cells. A person with type O blood doesn’t produce any antigens.

Blood is said to be “positive” or “negative” based on whether there are proteins on the red blood cells. If your blood has proteins, you’re Rh positive.

The blood types most at-risk for heart disease

Monitors used during Cardiac Surgery

People with type A, type B or type AB blood are more likely than people with type O to have a heart attack or experience heart failure, according to the American Heart Association.

While the increased risk is small (types A or B had a combined 8% higher risk of heart attack and 10% increased risk of heart failure, according to one large study) the difference in blood clotting rates is much higher, per the AHA. People in the same study with type A and B blood were 51% more likely to develop deep vein thrombosis and 47% more likely to develop a pulmonary embolism, which are severe blood clotting disorders which can also increase the risk of heart failure.

A reason for this increased risk, according to Guggenheim, might have to do with inflammation that happens in the bodies of people with type A, type B or type AB blood. The proteins present in type A and type B blood may cause more “blockage” or “thickening” in the veins and arteries, leading to an increased risk of clotting and heart disease.

Guggenheim also thinks this may describe the anecdotal (but currently inconclusive) decrease in risk of severe COVID-19 disease in people with type O blood, which has inspired research. Severe COVID-19 disease often causes heart problems, blood clotting and other cardiovascular issues.

Other consequences of blood type

People with type O blood enjoy a slightly lower risk of heart disease and blood clotting, but they may be more susceptible to hemorrhaging or bleeding disorders. This may be especially true after childbirth, according to a study on postpartum blood loss, which found an increased risk in women with type O blood.

 

Leave a Reply

Latest News

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

AngelCity-Creative-Company-Web-ad-349px-by-349px

Business